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Featured UIS Email
Change your NetID Password by October 01, 2019

Dear ______,

Please change your NetID password by midnight on Tuesday, October 01, 2019 Eastern Time by using the Password Station system found on the University Information Services website under the icon for NetID and Password.

If you delay or forget, your ____ NetID account will be locked and you will be unable to login.

Georgetown University experiences constant attacks by agents attempting to guess and/or acquire passwords. A routine password change is the most effective way to protect your data and that of others in the Georgetown community.

Your NetID password protects confidential information about Faculty, Staff, Students, and Alumni stored in a variety of GU systems. A single compromised NetID can be used to gain access to University computers that can then be used to attack other computers on our network.

You can verify this email message on the Georgetown University Information Services website.

Best regards,

Georgetown University Information Security

Box File Storage Outage - Bad Gateway Error

Dear Members of the Georgetown Community,

UIS is aware of a wide scale Box outage impacting all users at Georgetown University. Box cannot be accessed through the website, mobile app, or through services including Box Sync or Box Drive.

Box is aware of the issue and is providing updates at: https://status.box.com

The latest update from Box states:

We are actively investigating an issue with Box services and will continue to provide updates. If you are attempting to access the Box webapp you will see a 502 response. Calls to our API will also likely return a 502. Box Drive and Sync will likely show "Problem Items" or display as empty. The mobile application will show a cannot connect message.

No estimated time of resolution has been provided yet. https://help.georgetown.edu will be updated as we receive information from Box.

Judd Nicholson
Vice President for Information Technology
and Chief Information Officer

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (July 2019)

July 2019

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: the info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Migration progress!

Nick is a project manager on the Web Services team and also the leader of the WordPress migrations project. 

We’ve gotten to the point where we have the same number of WordPress sites launched as we have left to migrate! A huge thank you to you all for your hard work, cooperation and patience as we undertake this project. And a very special shoutout to our web production assistants who have been working tirelessly this summer to pick up the pace of our WordPress migrations.

Pie chart showing the WordPress migration status of all websites with 104 sites launched, 72 in content editor review, 18 in migration and 104 sites not yet migrated.

If you haven’t heard from us about your website migrating, stay tuned! We still have many more sites to get to over the next few months. Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions about the migration. 

Georgetown.edu redesign: An eventful summer (pun intended)

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the Georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

Friends, it’s getting real.

As Digital Pulp nears the end of the School of Foreign Service (SFS) build—what will eventually become the Georgetown school website theme—SFS has gotten access to the site and has begun entering content. As part of the handoff process, Digital Pulp led a training with representatives from SFS and Web Services to introduce us to the site components and the content management system in general. User acceptance testing (UAT) began last week, and any “bugs”—issues with the system—that SFS notices as they use the new site will be officially reported and triaged for Digital Pulp to fix.

As the SFS build winds down, we have turned our focus to a new target: the events calendar. While functionality still has a way to go before it can be previewed with a larger audience, Digital Pulp demoed how an editor might create and share a new event in the new system. Meanwhile, our GU working group is making a tentative timeline for rollout, based on when the top tier site will launch and when our Localist contract (our current events system contract) ends. We don’t want to leave you hanging with the events calendar details, but we want to make sure we’ve thought through as many scenarios and user needs as possible before sharing with the university—stay tuned!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

Welcome, Kevin! 

Kevin is the new accessibility coordinator, and a new addition to the Web Services team.

Hi, my name is Kevin Andrews and I'm the new electronic IT accessibility coordinator at Georgetown in UIS. My role is to help folks across campus ensure that their digital materials, including their website content, follow Georgetown's accessibility policy, which was implemented and put into place earlier this year. I come to Georgetown with experience testing websites and applications of varying levels of complexity for screen reader use and compatibility, and I believe in making the world, particularly our electronic spaces, a friendlier, more accessible and inclusive place for all. If you have any questions, comments or concerns, or want help with making or knowing whether something is accessible, please email webaccessibility@georgetown.edu. I will also hold office hours weekly, so if you'd rather get in touch that way, that's fine too. I look forward to working with you!

New office hours slots with our accessibility coordinator!

In addition to our WordPress office hours, which we will continue to hold every week, there are now appointment slots available to chat about your accessibility-related questions. Starting Tuesday, August 6, Kevin Andrews be available during our regularly-scheduled office hours to chat about accessibility. You can use the usual link to schedule an accessibility office hours appointment, just be sure to sign up for a spot titled “Accessibility Office Hours.” 

In the meantime, our WordPress office hours appointments will also be available as usual: every week, 2:30–3:30 p.m. Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101. When you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

You can sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot. Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email. 

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (June 2019)

June 2019

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: the info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: New features! 

After a tumultuous May and early June filled with change moratoria and staff departures, we were able to push out many new features in our recent deployment. These include an accessible dropdown menu, different colored backgrounds for cards and callouts, clone/copy page functionality and a full-width profile card block. 

If your site was previously using card decks, there may be some small issues with backwards compatibility following our updates. If you experience any issues, please consult our instructions for updating card decks after deployment. If you continue to experience issues after following these steps, please email webservices@georgetown.edu, and we’ll help get everything straightened out. 

Keep an eye on our documentation website for handy tips on how to use these and other features! And if you have any great ideas about new features you’d like to see in WordPress, please fill out our feature request form. 

 

Georgetown.edu redesign: Content is king

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the Georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

I’m happy to report that content creation and the build are in full swing! The Office of Strategic Communications (OCOMM) is taking the lead on content creation. They hosted a content bootcamp in early May to socialize the Georgetown Messaging, Voice, and Tone Guide and the modules that will be available on the new Georgetown.edu site. Content creators from around campus attended the hands-on workshop and created sample page layouts. Shortly after, OCOMM officially kicked off content creation for the new site, assigning pages from the sitemap, and handing off all the necessary resources.

To better focus our content, Digital Pulp also prepared and presented their keyword research for the new site. The presentation included a short SEO primer (what components go into SEO and how search engines rate website pages), a summary of what specific terms folks are searching for when they land on the Georgetown website and recommendations on which specific words we can use in title tags and meta descriptions in order to show that Georgetown.edu content is relevant in those searches. Content creation and creating title tags and meta descriptions have to happen more or less in tandem over the next six to eight weeks.

Meanwhile, Digital Pulp is building the site, which includes creating the modules for each page, as well as the long-awaited new events calendar system. At this point, that mostly means testing: installing the events calendar plugin, seeing what happens as events are synced across multiple test sites, and then editing an event and observing syncing capability. It is certainly one of the more tedious tasks, but one of the most important ones to get right—better to find any issues now than right before launch!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

WordPress office hours are every week!

 

We’re holding office hours every week 2:30–3:30 p.m.! Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101.

Not sure you can keep track of the location? Us neither, but don't despair; when you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

You can sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot. Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!

 

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email. 

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

 

Your NetID password expired June 15. Here’s what to do now.

Dear <first name>,

Your NetID password expired on June 15. If you did not update your password in the Password Management System, you will no longer have access to several accounts, including your Georgetown.​edu email.

If you have already updated your password, no further action is required on your part and you may disregard this message.

If your access has been suspended, or if you still need additional assistance, please contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Final reminder – your password expires tomorrow

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that all alumni must update NetID passwords by midnight June 15 using the Password Management System.

If you have already updated your password, no further action is required and you may disregard this message. However, if you have not yet changed your password, it will expire at midnight tomorrow, June 15, and your access to many Georgetown systems, including your Georgetown email, will be suspended.

Changing your password today takes just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Go to password.georgetown.edu

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password?

If you still need additional assistance, you may contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,

Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Reminder – have you updated your password

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that all alumni must update NetID passwords by midnight June 15.

If you have recently updated your NetID password, no further action is required and you may disregard this message. However, if you have not yet changed your password, your access to many Georgetown systems may be suspended.

Changing your password today will take just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Go to password.​georgetown.​edu

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password?

If you still need additional assistance, you may contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,
Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Notice – your password reset deadline is approaching

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that you must update your NetID password by midnight June 15. If you do not change your password within this timeframe, it will expire and you will no longer have access to several important Georgetown systems, including your Georgetown.edu email:

Georgetown's NetID Password Management System helps manage passwords for NetID users and requires a password update once per year to help keep accounts secure. Changing your password today takes just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Go to password.​georgetown.​edu

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password?

If you still need additional assistance, you may contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,
Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

The Cache: Updates From Web Services (May 2019)

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: the info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later. 

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Online WordPress training + summer of migrations

Our online Introduction to WordPress training course is now available through Canvas! After May, we’ll be moving away from holding in-person trainings in favor of the self-paced online course. Don’t worry, though; you’ll still be able to get in-person WordPress assistance through our weekly WordPress-specific office hours.

If you've already taken an online Web Services course, you can access our online Introduction to WordPress course by going to UIS Web Services Training Courses in Canvas and clicking Modules. Otherwise, you can fill out this form to register for the course.

Anyone can take the online training course at any time, but it’s especially important if your website is scheduled to migrate soon. We’re ahead of schedule for migrations so you may be hearing from us sooner than listed on the schedule. Over the summer we’ll be migrating about 150 websites to WordPress, so we want to thank you all in advance for embarking on this exciting project with us!

As always, feel free to email webservices@georgetown.edu if you have any concerns about your spot in the migration schedule or if you have any other questions that aren’t covered in the WordPress FAQs!

Accessibility with Alayna: Adiós

Alayna is a project manager on the Web Services team, and one of our web accessibility experts. In this column she’ll share her best tips for making your site more friendly for people who are using assistive technologies.

Sadly, I’ll be saying goodbye to The Cache and the Web Services team in June. After nearly four and half years at Georgetown, I’m following my partner to Berkeley, California where he’ll be starting his MBA.

I’ve loved working at Georgetown, and readers like you help make every day better than the last. Thank you for all the love for this column and your commitment to making Georgetown a more accessible place for everyone! This column will be on hiatus for now, but we’ll be sure to keep you updated on any accessibility news in the meantime.

Wish me luck in sunny California and find me on LinkedIn!

Georgetown.edu redesign: Hunkering down

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the Georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

While Digital Pulp is busy building the new Georgetown.edu and the school website theme, the internal working group has its own work to do, namely, content creation and integration work.

Content work begins with making sure everyone is on the same page (pun intended). To that end, the Office of Strategic Communications (OCOMM) hosted a half-day workshop to socialize the appropriate style guides; hear Digital Pulp content strategists present the Messaging, Voice and Tone Guide with before-and-after examples; and introduce the modules that Digital Pulp plans to build and what type of content might live in each.

While OCOMM spearheads content, Web Services is hunkering down on integration work—that is, pulling certain other technology services into the new website. Digital Pulp is building the new website, but certain pieces—namely GU360 integration, the search component, and the emergency banner—will be completed by Web Services.

Though it’s a bit further off, we are also starting to discuss how the new Georgetown.edu website theme (and the new school theme, of course) may mesh with our existing WordPress sites. We don’t have much more detail at this time, but we want you to know that it’s on our radar. More about that (and other integration work) in future Cache articles!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

Welcome, Dash!

Dash is a Senior Full Stack Developer, and a new addition to the Web Services team.

David Dashifen Kees joins us after a career elsewhere in higher education. Dash previously worked for Lehigh University, from which they also earned a degree in Computer Science, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dash left Illinois in March 2018 and tried their hand at agency work, but the pace and environment didn’t suit them. So, when our search for a senior full stack developer popped up on their radar, they jumped at the chance to apply.

When not at the office, Dash is working on a master’s in Divinity from the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado as a remote Journey student. They’ve been married for almost 14 years to Megan—a board certified ER veterinarian in Springfield, Virginia—and their family consists of a dog, three cats and four snakes. Beyond software development, Dash has been running an ongoing weekend game of Shadowrun, a cyberpunk themed table-top role playing game, since 2001; enjoys reading fiction and nonfiction on a variety of topics; and worships at the altar of all things Marvel. They’re in the Harris Building 2071-A, so feel free to stop by and say hello!

WordPress office hours are every week!

We’re holding office hours every week 2:30–3:30pm! Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101 like usual.

Not sure you can keep track of the location? Us neither, but don't despair; when you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

You can sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot.

Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (April 2019)

Web Services is doing some spring cleaning. Share your favorite tip from today’s Cache with your coworker who can tell you allllll about the KonMari Method™.

cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.
 

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Change moratoria—times are not changing

Commencement and finals season are right around the corner! For those of us at UIS, this means change moratorium season. (No, not the Mortara Center.) To ensure all of our systems are functioning at full capacity, UIS institutes a hold on all changes to systems that could potentially impact the University community during these important times. 

For Web Services, this means we’re not able to push out any new features or updates, and we’re not able to launch any new websites unless there is an emergency. For our content editors (that’s you!), this means we’ll be a little slower with getting out new feature requests and we will not be able to launch any new sites between May 1 and May 20.
 
 

One other reminder: If your site has already migrated to WordPress, please make sure you fill out our WordPress migration feedback form. This is an important tool we use to gauge how well migrations are going and improve our process.

Feel free to email webservices@georgetown.edu if you have any concerns about your spot in the queue or if you have any other questions that aren’t covered in the WordPress FAQs!

Accessibility with Alayna: Spring cleaning with Siteimprove

Alayna’s back this month! Thanks to Joni and Reed for guest-starring and teaching us more about accessibility from a dev perspective.

Siteimprove makes it really easy to do some much-needed spring cleaning on your website! Try tackling these tasks the next time you have a spare moment. Each one should only take 10–15 minutes!

None of the Siteimprove links work? That means you probably don’t have access to Siteimprove. Log in here with your NetID and password, and reply to this email to let us know what site(s) you need access to.

  1. Find and fix broken links. Siteimprove’s broken links section makes it really easy to find and fix broken links on your site. Knock out a couple on the pages with broken links list between meetings!
  2. Take care of some easy-as-pie accessibility issues. Some of the easiest issues to fix are due to formatting, like “‘u’ tag used to format text”. To remove underlines, use the U underline button in the Drupal or WordPress editor, or remove the <u> tags from the HTML code. Instead of using underlines to highlight important information, use headings.
  3. Review and make Decisions on your images. Making a Decision on a Review issue removes it from your issues list—checking things off is so satisfying! If you don’t have access to make a Decision on Review issues, check out our Decisions in Siteimprove online course.

Happy spring!

Have questions or suggestions on what you’d like to see covered in future Accessibility with Alayna column topics? Email webaccessibility@georgetown.edu with your ideas!

Georgetown.edu redesign: Meetings that spark joy

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the Georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

Phase 1 is officially done! Discovery, UI/UX, and design are completed and approved, and now it’s full steam ahead for the build and content work. Our vendor, Digital Pulp, has begun setting up the site in Pantheon, our hosting provider. We’re also working with Digital Pulp on other setup details, like ensuring that the necessary plugins are purchased and the approved fonts are readily available for developers. In terms of content, our partners in the Office of Strategic Communications are organizing a bootcamp to get content creators familiar with the new Georgetown.edu template and how to create content that adheres to the relevant style guides.

While Phase 2 is gearing up, we did some spring cleaning of our own: adjusting our process for the different kind of work this phase entails. One such change included modifying our meeting schedule: Now that we’re doing a lot of “heads down” work, multiple check-ins each week aren’t always necessary. That means the meetings we do have are super important.

As with most things in life, preparation is everything. See below for simple tips to start your meetings off on the right foot! FYI, these tips assume that you’re using Google Calendar invitations for all your meetings, but most features are available with other calendar services.

  1. Every meeting should have an agenda, and all meeting participants (when possible) should have the chance to see the agenda ahead of time. Agendas are so important, because it gives you the chance to organize your thoughts—which is pretty great, because how often do you get the chance to do that in a typical workday? Most importantly, an agenda is the best litmus test for determining if it’s time to have a meeting: If you’re struggling to come up with agenda items, that probably means you don’t need an official meeting after all—at least not yet. The agenda also serves as a map for the meeting, helping team members stay on task and making sure nothing gets left out.
  2. Link or attach relevant documents to the meeting invitation. Have you had to dig through your Google Drive lately to find that one spreadsheet, or searched your inbox to find that really helpful link that you got from that one person a while ago? You don’t want to have to do that in a meeting. Attaching all relevant resources directly in the calendar event will save time and sanity.
  3. Someone should be taking notes and recording action items. Know from the beginning who is taking notes. Better yet, name that meeting’s scribe in the event’s description, right along with the agenda. If it’s a recurring meeting (e.g., a weekly status or check-in call), consider a “meeting notes log”: one single Google Doc attached to the recurring calendar event, where a running list of notes and action items are kept. Be sure to assign action items if they are applicable: what should be done after the meeting and who’s going to do it.

Hope these tips are helpful as you spring forward (that’s right, I went there) into your next meeting!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

WordPress office hours are every week!

We’re holding office hours every week 2:30–3:30pm! Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101 like usual.

Not sure you can keep track of the location? Us neither, but don't despair; when you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

You can sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot. 

Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!
 
How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

Action Needed: Critical Security Update for Chrome Users

Dear Georgetown Community,

Last week, Google announced a significant vulnerability in its Chrome browser allowing malicious actors to send code remotely to unpatched versions of the browser. At this time, Google is not currently releasing any additional details.

Shortly after the announcement, an update was released, which should have been downloaded to each computer due to Google's auto-update feature. Because Chrome requires a restart for updates to take effect, the UIS Security Office is requesting all users restart their Google Chrome browsers immediately. Those who are not frequent Chrome users, but have it installed, should open their browser and follow the steps below to ensure the vulnerability is patched.

The up-to-date version of Chrome is 72.0.3626.121 and can be checked by the following steps:

  • On your computer, open Chrome.
  • At the top right, click More More.
  • Click Help and then About Google Chrome.

If there is a "Restart" button, select that and your browser will be patched. Once completed, patched users should see "Google Chrome is up to date."

The UIS Security Team is working to ensure this update is pushed to all users and will broadcast the message on its social media pages. The Security Team is also working on a means to identify anyone who may be affected.

We will provide more information as it becomes available For any questions, please reach out to security@georgetown.edu.

Sincerely,

Judd Nicholson

Vice President and Chief Information Officer

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (March 2019)

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Growing with WordPress

Rob is the product manager for the Web Services team.

WordPress launched a new editor called Gutenberg on December 6, 2018. We tracked development on Gutenberg for almost a year prior to the public launch, and have made many tweaks to Georgetown's WordPress platform before and after the launch. There have been quirks and annoyances with Gutenberg as there are with any new piece of software, and we appreciate your patience as we work on improving the editor experience.

Thanks to everyone who has sent us feedback. We're committed to making the editor experience as smooth as possible by continually improving our platform going forward. To that end, we'll soon include release notes with each update we make—typically every two weeks or so—on our documentation site. And you can always submit a bug report or feature request via our Google form.

A quick update on our migration: We have a small team of hardworking project managers and students working on Georgetown's monumental migration—300+ sites migrated from Drupal to WordPress by the end of this year. As of today, we've launched 21 sites, with about 60 additional sites currently in progress.

As a reminder, you can view our WordPress migration schedule, which lists approximate three-month windows for site migrations.

Feel free to email webservices@georgetown.edu if you have any concerns about your spot in the queue or if you have any other questions that aren’t covered in the WordPress FAQs!

Accessibility with (Alayna) Reed: Captions and transcripts

This month’s accessibility article guest-stars Reed Piernock, a Senior Web Developer on the UIS Web Services team. In addition to Reed’s experience in making Georgetown’s 300+ websites accessible, they also earned a certificate last year in Information Accessibility Design and Policy through the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing use a computer for reading documents, writing email, or browsing websites. However, if audio or video content is not created and presented accessibly, it could frustrate those users who want to access that content. Most text on the internet is written clearly and concisely, making it much easier for the deaf and hard of hearing to comprehend. This is where captions and transcripts come in!

Captions are important to video content, so users don’t have to rely on guesswork to make sense of what they are watching. They differ from subtitles, which only provide actual speech; captions also include other audible information in a video, such as other audio content or aural cues. To be as accessible as possible, captions should appear on screen at the same time as audio content and contain identical wording as the spoken content. Open captions are always displayed to the audience, while closed captions have the ability to display or hide. If you’re not sure how to add good quality captions to videos (or what “good quality” captions even means), check out this online captioning tutorial for YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook.  

Both YouTube and Vimeo offer options to include captions and subtitles; transcripts can be included in the description area of the video page. Transcripts offer many of the same features as captions, such as all spoken and auxiliary audio content, but are offered independently from the audio or video content. For audio-only content such as podcasts, transcripts are especially important as all of the content is presented audibly. Transcripts may be placed on the same webpage as the embedded media or in a separate document available via link from the content. They are also quite useful for quick content, where the captions cannot maintain a readable speed. The audience can then access the transcript to go over any information they may have missed, or would like to review later. See a transcript of a This American Life podcast episode for an example of a transcript.

WebAIM strongly recommends both captions and transcripts to accompany audio-visual media in order to be fully accessible. Building these features as you create your content from the beginning will make it much easier to keep accessibility in mind. Also be sure to review Georgetown’s Accessibility Procedures and Guidelines for Video and Audio.

Have questions or suggestions on what you’d like to see covered in future Accessibility with Alayna column topics? Email webaccessibility@georgetown.edu with your ideas!

Georgetown.edu redesign: Tedious but important things. 

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

This month, we are in two phases at once: the end of design and the beginning of build. For design, we’re taking the next couple weeks to go through the last of the template designs and make any final touches. Though we’ve already spent weeks on design so far, this last remaining batch has its own challenges because (1) there are so many templates to review—10 total—and (2) there are some really important pages in this batch, too. In particular, we pouring over the “Areas of Study” page: a big, filterable list of Georgetown’s programs, all on one page. If you are even a little familiar with Georgetown’s programs, you understand the magnitude of the endeavor, and the challenges of listing all of Georgetown’s offerings in a single place. We want to make sure that users will be able to navigate through programs effectively and find what they’re looking for without getting overwhelmed or frustrated—a particular challenge when it comes to designing this page for tiny mobile devices.

Then, there’s the technical stuff (stay with me!). We’ve been at this for a year, more or less, and we’re now at the point where we have to build the thing. (“Build,” in case you were wondering, is a fancy way of saying “we’ve done an awful lot of working asking our stakeholders what they want out of a new site, and making plans on plans for how the site will look and operate, and now all that’s left is to make the site.”) We recently got a few technical docs from our vendor, Digital Pulp, that describe how they plan to go about the build, what their process is, and how much it will cost. There are as many ways to make a site as there are developers (and project managers, I guess), so we’re peppering Digital Pulp with all kinds of nerdy and technical questions so we can get a better sense of their style and process. We should have the paperwork signed in the next month or so—fingers crossed!

Last, we are also beginning our content planning work. We recently received a giant spreadsheet from Digital Pulp that contains all of the pages that, in Digital Pulp’s professional opinion, should be on the new website (71 pages, in case you were wondering). Each row of the spreadsheet represents a page on the site, and each column has helpful information like which page template should be used, where in the site menu it should fall, and if it is brand-new content or if content from the existing site can be brought over. For now, Digital Pulp’s work with content is done; it’s up to the working group to review each piece of content and assign writers, establish an approval process, and set deadlines. Behold the power of spreadsheets!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

WordPress office hours are every week!

We’re holding office hours every week 2:30–3:30pm! Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101 like usual.

Not sure you can keep track of the location? Us neither, but don't despair; when you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

You can sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot.

Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (February 2019)

February 2019

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

New Georgetown accessibility policy

This is a message from all Web Services staff, because all of us care deeply about accessibility and have have spent many, many hours making our sites accessible to all users. But if we had to single some people out, we’d give major kudos to Emma Craswell and Alayna Ruberg, who have worked tirelessly with our campus partners to develop this Georgetown-wide policy and usher it through the approval process.

All faculty and staff received an email on February 26 with the subject line “Announcing New Policy on Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility.” The short version is that all of the accessibility guidelines and best practices that we’ve been harping on for the past two years are now backed by a brand-new, university-wide accessibility policy. The new policy applies to all Electronic and Information Technology (“EIT”), not just websites, and is meant to articulate already existing accessibility laws.

We encourage all website editors to review the procedures and guidelines, read the FAQ, and visit accessibility.georgetown.edu to see how you can roll up your sleeves and make your sites (and potentially other technology) accessible.

Thank you for your help in making Georgetown welcoming and inclusive for all individuals. We love the positive vibes!

WordPress Update: Migration Schedule

Nick is the project manager leading the WordPress migrations.

Wondering when your site is slated to migrate to WordPress? You’re in luck! You can now view the published WordPress migration schedule. Please keep in mind that this is an approximation of the three-month period when your site will migrate, and that the exact month we start your migration may vary.

We have limited flexibility for shifting sites around in the migration schedule, but please let us know if your site is currently scheduled in a time period that will absolutely not work. Note that migrations will require little to no work for site editors other than a quick review of the site.

Feel free to email webservices@georgetown.edu if you have any concerns about your spot in the queue or if you have any other questions that aren’t covered in the WordPress FAQs!

Accessibility with (Alayna) Joni: Making friends with your keyboard

This month, we feature special guest star Joni Halabi, Web Services’ very own Senior Javascript Developer (and all-around WordPress and accessibility expert)!

Most people use their mouse to navigate a website: to scroll up and down a page, click on links, open menus, and navigate forms.

However, there are plenty of people who are unable to use a mouse. This could be because of a permanent disability that does not give them the ability or coordination to use a mouse, or because of a special circumstance that makes using a mouse really hard—for example, my cat is sitting on my mouse or my baby is banging on my trackpad like a drum!

For people who are unable to use a mouse for any reason, the keyboard becomes their new BFF. What does that mean for you, the site content editor?

Good news everyone! If you’re using a shared Georgetown theme, your site theme is accessible. This means that most of your site—header, footer, navigation, etc—is already usable with only a keyboard. The only part of your site that you need to be concerned about is your content.

Make sure your site’s content is usable with only a keyboard! To test your site, pretend your mouse does not exist. In fact, disconnect your mouse, if you can. Use your up and down arrow keys to scroll through the page. Use the tab key to navigate from link to link. Make sure that your active link is highlighted. Usually, that means the link has a blue border around it. Use the enter key to "click" on the active link.

Your goal is to be able to read and use the entire page without needing your mouse. If you can do this, congratulations! If not, take a look at your content. Are you doing something non-standard or custom? Are you using HTML in a way that is not its intended purpose? If so, that code could be the cause of your keyboard issues.

Have questions or suggestions on what you’d like to see covered in future Accessibility with Alayna column topics? Email webaccessibility@georgetown.edu with your ideas!

Georgetown.edu redesign: Spirit of Georgetown

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

Friends, it has been an incredibly intense couple of weeks, but we are thrilled to say that global design is done, done, done! We chose a design direction in late December and worked with our vendor, Digital Pulp, over the course of two months to refine and tweak, and we didn’t stop until we had a homepage that represents Georgetown and its people through and through—its energy, passion, and drive. Want to see? Visit the redesign blog for a peek.

What’s next? Believe it or not, more design. Global design only includes three page templates—the homepage, landing page, and article page—so that we can get a feel of where design is going before moving on to the other page templates. Now that globals are done, we can apply the design concepts from those initial pages to the other page templates (there are roughly 10 more) and to mobile design. This next round is called template design, and will officially start at the end of February with a presentation from Digital Pulp.

While Digital Pulp is working on the template designs, our core team is using the time to plan for the build. The plan is for Digital Pulp to build the new Georgetown.edu site, with Web Services (that’s us!) working closely with them to ensure seamless integration between the new Georgetown.edu site and the other school and unit sites that are in our shared templates. This mostly means a lot of planning: developers from each team coming together to talk about workflows and methods for writing code; getting familiar with Digital Pulp’s build process to see how we can assist without slowing them down; and most important of all, determining what exactly we want out of a new website. The more organized we are in the next few weeks, the better the build will be.

Believe it or not, we’re also starting the content creation process this month. Every page intended for the new site is catalogued in a giant spreadsheet and just waiting for someone from our talented editorial team to bring them to life. Read more about it in the next Cache!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

Starting in March: WordPress office hours are every week!

Starting in March, we'll be holding office hours every week 2:30–3:30pm! Every other week we'll host on Zoom, and the other weeks we'll host in Car Barn 101 like usual.

Not sure you can keep track of the location? Us neither, but don't despair; when you sign up for an appointment slot, the meeting on your calendar will include the location.

On March 5, we'll have our first Zoom office hours 2:30–3:30pm. Sign up for an appointment slot (for any future office hours date!) here. You can still drop in anytime, but we can’t guarantee you’ll be helped immediately, so we recommend signing up for a slot.

Keep an eye on the appointment calendar and our website for updates!

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (January 2019)

January 2019

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Migrations continue!

Nick is the project manager leading the WordPress migrations.

We’ve launched the first few sites in WordPress and have more than 30 more WordPress sites currently under review by site editors. Here is what the process will look like when your site comes up in our queue:

  1. Web Services reaches out to site editors a few weeks before their migration group will start migrations. This email will include links to our WordPress documentation, sign-ups for WordPress training, and specific WordPress office hours for hands-on assistance.
  2. Site editors are notified the day we start their migration and are asked to hold on edits to the Drupal site.
  3. Web Services creates a new WordPress site and copies the current content into the new site. We then clean up the content and review the site. This process can take between 2-12 work hours.
  4. Site editors have one week to review their WordPress site. More time is allotted for large sites or those working on content.
  5. We launch the new WordPress site and retire the Drupal site.

There should be little to no work required from content editors other than a quick review of the new WordPress site. Because we want to keep the migration period to a minimum, we’d ask that any significant restructuring of a site’s content be done prior to starting the migration or after the new WordPress site is launched.

Feel free to email webservices@georgetown.edu if you’d like to move up in the migrations queue or if you have any other questions that aren’t covered in the WordPress FAQs!

Accessibility with Alayna: How do I know if a website is accessible?

Alayna is a project manager on the Web Services team, and one of our web accessibility experts. In this column she’ll share her best tips for making your site more friendly for people who are using assistive technologies.

One of the most common questions I get asked is “Alayna, can you tell me if this website is accessible?” It’s a great (but difficult to answer) question! There are a few things you should be thinking about if you’re finding yourself asking if a website is accessible.

First of all, what level of compliance are you after? At Georgetown, all websites need to be AA-compliant (meaning they’re both A-compliant and AA-compliant). You can read more about compliance levels on the W3C’s website, but fair warning: It’s kind of a technical read.

Technically speaking, a website that meets the AA standard is accessible, but the AAA standard is even more accessible. Accessibility isn’t always black and white, so the “Is this accessible?” question doesn’t really have a yes or no answer.

Second: accessibility compliance can change! If a developer makes their website 100% AA-compliant, the website could fall out of compliance if they add content that’s not accessible. So a website that is accessible one day may not be accessible the next.

Lastly, you can check yourself if the website is not accessible. The accessibility website has a list of testing tools–try adding the Siteimprove Chrome extension or using the manual testing checklist. If you have the Siteimprove extension installed, you can easily see at the click of a button if a site has any errors. Or, put your mouse away and try navigating the website with only your keyboard; if you can’t get to areas of the page with the tab and arrow keys, the site probably isn’t accessible.

Have questions or suggestions on what you’d like to see covered in future Accessibility with Alayna column topics? Email webaccessibility@georgetown.edu with your ideas!

Georgetown.edu redesign: We’ve got a visual

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.
 
 

As promised, this Georgetown.edu project update is all about design! Welcome to our most complex deliverable yet.

In December, we received two design concepts from our vendor, Digital Pulp. The concepts included mockups for new homepage, landing page, and article page (among others) to give us an idea of what Digital Pulp’s proposed design would look like with different kinds of content in different contexts.

Step one when evaluating a design is to present it to Georgetown’s Visual Identity committee. The idea here is not necessarily to ask what they like and don’t like about the designs—that comes later. Instead, designers on the committee reviewed the Georgetown.edu concepts to ensure that they adhered to Georgetown’s brand guidelines—to make sure that the right colors are incorporated, that the seal is properly represented, and that the correct fonts are used.

Once we had the visual identity committee’s approval, we presented the designs to the advisory group. The idea at this stage was to explore what feelings each design concept evoked; answering questions like “Does this design reflect the Georgetown you know?” and “Which adjectives do you think apply to this design direction?”

Next was user testing. This step will be familiar to those of you who stayed updated while we were reviewing wireframes. This time, the UI/UX-oriented members of the redesign team spent two days with students specifically (or target audience), asking them what they thought about the design concepts.

This month, it’s up to us to gather feedback on these directions—our own feedback as well as our advisory group’s and the students’—to determine which we like best and what should be refined. In the background, we’re also continuing to plan for the build: reviewing functional requirements and exploring questions about integration, SEO, and content.

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (December 2018)

December 2018

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

 

Happy holidays!

Dear Drupal content editors, WordPress content editors, and other friends of Web Services,

We’ll keep this brief, as we’re sure all of you are as eager to finish up the last of 2018’s work and turn on the vacation responder as we are.

This has been a hectic, eventful, and fabulous year: We developed and launched our first WordPress sites, began a redesign of Georgetown.edu, enhanced our accessibility policy and resources, and dozens of other projects in between. Above all, we have continued to be amazed by your friendship, support, and helpful feedback, and we can’t wait to roll up our sleeves and continue our work with you in January.

We wish you a warm and restful holiday break, and a new year filled with meaning, learning, and caring.

We can’t wait to see what 2019 has in store.

Warmest wishes,
Alayna, Danielle, Emma, Fabian, Joni, Mark, Nick, Reed, Rob, and Vad

 

Web Services holiday gift set

The perfect gift for the coworker who is making last-minute edits to your Georgetown website before break. (You should probably get them, like, a Starbucks gift card or something, too.)

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (November 2018)

November 2018

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later.

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Migratory happenings

Rob is the product manager for the Web Services team.

The first wave of WordPress sites are launching this month! In the meantime, we're still making small adjustments behind the scenes to ensure that everything looks good and works properly. Our team will continue to monitor migrations closely over the next year and make tweaks as necessary.

We've also started holding in-person training sessions for migrating sites. These training sessions are only open to folks who are actively working on a site migration; you'll receive an invitation when your site is next up in the queue. We're also planning WordPress migration-focused office hours to be held over the next few months.

As a reminder, here's the general migration process: We'll contact you a few weeks or so before your site comes up in the next batch of sites scheduled for migration. Much of the migration is automated; we'll go over the parts of the migration that Web Services handles and what you need to do—in addition to providing you with documentation and optionally in-person training. Then you'll have a period of time to prep your site for launch. Once you're finished, we'll do a quick audit of the site together and make sure everything is in good shape. A launch date will be scheduled and your new WordPress site will go live at the appointed date and time!

Check out our WordPress FAQs page for more information on our move to WordPress.

Tips on conquering your information architecture

Fabian is a UI/UX (that’s nerd shorthand for user experience/user interface) designer on the Web Services team. Fabian’s focus is on making Georgetown websites effective and easy to use—or in his words, he “brings confetti to websites.”

Winter is coming! UIS Web Services has been working feverishly to make WordPress migration as seamless as possible as winter approaches. Though our team can't provide one-on-one content strategy help for each website, the following are some great tips just in case you may be thinking of overhauling content on your site.

Know your audience + understand user needs

First, picture the main audiences of your school or department—who are you speaking to? You should have at least three audiences in mind.

Then determine what the top needs of your audiences are. I would recommend reaching out to members of your audience and asking them about their top three needs on the website. Try to have discussions in person, or set up a qualitative survey. If you go the survey route and get stuck, the Nielsen Norman Group has several tips for creating great qualitative surveys.

At the same time, you should look at your quantitative metrics with Google Analytics and analyze how your users are using your website. Top things to look for are:

  • Top landing pages
  • Number of visitors
  • Unique visitors
  • Pages per visit
  • Bounce rate
  • Average time on site
What is the tone and voice of your website?

What is the overall message and tone your department would like to convey? Your department needs to be able to connect to the audience you are speaking to in order to convey your main messages. Duo Consulting’s voice and tone article is a great resource to understand the basics of how to use tone and voice for your website.

Organize your website (information architecture)

Once you have an idea of your audience, how your audience is using the site (top landing pages, where is the traffic coming from, mobile vs desktop audiences), and know the tone and voice you want to express, you and your team can review the pages of your website a bit closer and see if it makes sense (i.e., “Does this page belong under this section?”, “Is the tone and voice tailored to the audience we want to address?...”).

Organizing your website may be daunting. However, the best approach is to try to break your sites in digestible steps so that it can be conquered.

1. Decide what your top 6-7 links are in your navigation. These top links can be viewed as your categories.

2. Organize the rest of your content under these top categories. Most or all of your remaining content should connect strongly with one of these top-level items.

3. If you have doubt as to where a specific page should live, work with your peers to determine where it should go with a simple card sorting. Card sorting may help you find a home for the pages that may need a second opinion from your peers or audience.

If you’d like more information on how to build your site’s navigation, check out Neil Patel’s blog and James Kalbach’s article on designing web navigation.

Content inventory/audit

Finally, once you have an idea on how your new website is going to be organized, it’s time to look over all of your content that you have and decide what needs to be re-edited, purged, or moved to a different section of the website. This step is crucial for trimming the fat off the website.

I hope these tips help you to understand how to look at your website, and begin the steps of understanding your audience’s needs.

Georgetown.edu redesign: Wired

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

We are happy to say that we approved the sitemap and first round of wireframes! This milestone is important because it means we have agreed on a basic direction when it comes to functionality, layout, and content structure.

That being said, the site prototype is still in its most simple form, and there is a lot of work left to do. First, we have another set of wireframes to review. This next (and last) set of wireframes is meant to encompass all the page layouts we will need on the Georgetown.edu site—even templates like the search results and 404 pages. We have at least 10 more wireframes this round, so we’ll be quite busy during these feedback periods. We’ve also asked our advisory group to take a look at these wireframes to make sure there’s nothing we missed.

Approval of this last round of wireframes will kick off two events. First, the design process begins (I think it’s fair to say this is the part most of us have been waiting for). We’ll talk color, we’ll talk font, and we’ll channel the part of all of us that secretly loves Pinterest.

Our vendor, Digital Pulp, will also start a brand-new set of wireframes; not for Georgetown.edu this time, but for Georgetown’s school sites. That’s right, school sites are getting a facelift too—bonus project! The School of Foreign Service (SFS) has graciously agreed to be our partner through this process, and will be the very first Georgetown school to live in this new WordPress theme. The school template project kicks off in December—more details in the next Cache!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

Accessibility with Alayna: How do I make my website accessible?

Alayna is a project manager on the Web Services team, and one of our web accessibility experts. In this column she’ll share her best tips for making your site more friendly for people who are using assistive technologies.

New content alert! The accessibility website has a new section you want to check out if you’re a checklist fan like I am. The Getting Started page has everything you need to make your UIS-themed or non-UIS-themed website accessible from the get-go.

If you have a UIS Drupal site, the UIS-themed page is for you. The Getting Started with Accessibility section will set you on the right track to start your accessibility practice. If you’re already a Siteimprove expert, check out the “Keeping your UIS-themed website accessible” checklist for tips on how to maintain accessibility on your site.

Do you have ideas for checklists or content that should be available on the accessibility site? Let us know! We love hearing about ways to improve the website. Email us at webaccessibility@georgetown.edu.

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or you are no longer responsible for editing a website that uses a shared Georgetown template, please let us know by replying to this email.

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

Duo Two-Factor Required by December 22

Dear Colleagues,
 
To protect electronically accessed university data, UIS introduced a policy requiring Duo, a two-factor authentication method. Duo is a proactive way to protect Georgetown, increase our cyber security, and guard against malicious compromise of university accounts.  

We have been working in phases to enroll users in Duo.Duo is now required for all staff, faculty, students and associates deemed employees and have access to GMS for university compensation or any financial administration and management.
 
The deadline for enrolling in Duo is December 22, 2018.  Systems that will require Duo two-factor authentication include:

  • GMS
  • Google Apps (email, calendar, etc.)
  • Banner
  • MyAccess
  • Canvas
  • Blackboard
  • eRIC/Huron
  • Titanium
  • VPN 

UIS technical teams will be meeting with departments to assist with enrollment and training. . The walk-up Help Desk in the University bookstore can also assist you.  Online step-by-step instructions can be found at apps.georgetown.edu/duo.
 
Our goal is to minimize the risk to our systems and data. Help us to improve our cyber security and enroll in Duo today.
 
Thank you,
 
Judd Nicholson
Vice President for Information Technology
  and Chief Information Officer

Duo Will Be Required by December 22

Dear Colleagues,
 
To protect electronically accessed university data, UIS introduced a policy requiring Duo, a two-factor authentication method. Duo is a proactive way to protect Georgetown, increase our cyber security, and guard against malicious compromise of university accounts.  

We have been working in phases to enroll users in Duo.Duo is now required for all staff, faculty, students and associates deemed employees and have access to GMS for university compensation or any financial administration and management.
 
The deadline for enrolling in Duo is December 22, 2018.  Systems that will require Duo two-factor authentication include:

  • GMS
  • Google Apps (email, calendar, etc.)
  • Banner
  • MyAccess
  • Canvas
  • Blackboard
  • eRIC/Huron
  • Titanium
  • VPN

UIS technical teams will be meeting with departments to assist with enrollment and training. . The walk-up Help Desk in the University bookstore can also assist you.  Online step-by-step instructions can be found at apps.georgetown.edu/duo.
 
Our goal is to minimize the risk to our systems and data. Help us to improve our cyber security and enroll in Duo today.
 
Thank you,
 
Judd Nicholson
Vice President for Information Technology
  and Chief Information Officer

December 22:  Deadline for Enrolling in Duo

Dear Colleagues,
 
To protect electronically accessed university data, UIS introduced a policy requiring Duo, a two-factor authentication method. Duo is a proactive way to protect Georgetown, increase our cyber security, and guard against malicious compromise of university accounts.  

We have been working in phases to enroll users in Duo.Duo is now required for all staff, faculty, students and associates deemed employees and have access to GMS for university compensation or any financial administration and management.
 
The deadline for enrolling in Duo is December 22, 2018.  Systems that will require Duo two-factor authentication include:

  • GMS
  • Google Apps (email, calendar, etc.)
  • Banner
  • MyAccess
  • Canvas
  • Blackboard
  • eRIC/Huron
  • Titanium
  • VPN

UIS technical teams will be meeting with departments to assist with enrollment and training. . The walk-up Help Desk in the University bookstore can also assist you.  Online step-by-step instructions can be found at apps.georgetown.edu/duo.
 
Our goal is to minimize the risk to our systems and data. Help us to improve our cyber security and enroll in Duo today.
 
Thank you,
 
Judd Nicholson
Vice President for Information Technology
  and Chief Information Officer

Save Yourself the Trouble by Enrolling in Duo Today!

Dear Colleagues,
 
To protect electronically accessed university data, UIS introduced a policy requiring Duo, a two-factor authentication method. Duo is a proactive way to protect Georgetown, increase our cyber security, and guard against malicious compromise of university accounts.  

We have been working in phases to enroll users in Duo.Duo is now required for all staff, faculty, students and associates deemed employees and have access to GMS for university compensation or any financial administration and management.
 
The deadline for enrolling in Duo is December 22, 2018.  Systems that will require Duo two-factor authentication include:

  • GMS
  • Google Apps (email, calendar, etc.)
  • Banner
  • MyAccess
  • Canvas
  • Blackboard
  • eRIC/Huron
  • Titanium
  • VPN

UIS technical teams will be meeting with departments to assist with enrollment and training. . The walk-up Help Desk in the University bookstore can also assist you.  Online step-by-step instructions can be found at apps.georgetown.edu/duo.
 
Our goal is to minimize the risk to our systems and data. Help us to improve our cyber security and enroll in Duo today.
 
Thank you,
 
Judd Nicholson
Vice President for Information Technology
  and Chief Information Officer

Your NetID password expired November 12. Here’s what to do now.

Dear <first name>,

Your NetID password expired on November 12. If you did not update your password in the Password Management System, you will no longer have access to several accounts, including your Georgetown.​edu email.

If you have already updated your password, no further action is required on your part and you may disregard this message.

If your access has been suspended, or if you still need additional assistance, please contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Final reminder – your password expires tomorrow

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that all alumni must update NetID passwords by midnight November 12 using the Password Management System.

If you have already updated your password, no further action is required and you may disregard this message. However, if you have not yet changed your password, it will expire at midnight tomorrow, November 12, and your access to many Georgetown systems, including your Georgetown email, will be suspended.

Changing your password today takes just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Go to password.georgetown.edu

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password?

If you still need additional assistance, you may contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,

Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Reminder – have you updated your password

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that all alumni must update NetID passwords by midnight November 12.

If you have recently updated your NetID password, no further action is required and you may disregard this message. However, if you have not yet changed your password, your access to many Georgetown systems may be suspended.

Changing your password today will take just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Go to password.​georgetown.​edu

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password?

If you still need additional assistance, you may contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,
Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website:
htt​ps:​//uis.​georgetown.​edu/verify

 

Notice – your password reset deadline is approaching

Dear <first name>,

This is a reminder that you must update your NetID password by midnight November 12. If you do not change your password within this timeframe, it will expire and you will no longer have access to several important Georgetown systems, including your Georgetown.edu email:

Georgetown's NetID Password Management System helps manage passwords for NetID users and requires a password update once per year to help keep accounts secure. Changing your password today takes just a few minutes and can help protect you from cyber intrusion.

Change Your Password [button]

Have you forgotten your GU NetID or password? Contact the Service Center at help.georgetown.edu.

Regards,
Georgetown University Information Systems
uis.georgetown.edu

Verify the authenticity of this message on the GU UIS website at http://uis.georgetown.edu.

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (October 2018)

October 2018—our one-year anniversary!

The Cache turns 1 today. Share something sweet with your colleague who never forgets a coworker’s birthday.

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later. 

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: Launches starting next month!

Rob is the product manager for the Web Services team.

We're finally on the brink of launching Georgetown's WordPress platform after a year's worth of hard work to get things ready for the WordPress migration.

This has involved building and testing a template similar to our existing "Whitehaven" template for Drupal (seen on sites like McCourt and Study Abroad); getting everything set up on Pantheon, our new hosting provider; writing documentation and training materials; and laying extensive groundwork for smooth migrations from our existing Drupal platform to WordPress. In the end, we'll have a platform that looks similar to what we had before but with a completely new engine. A more intuitive admin interface, better/faster caching, and simpler platform management on our end should mean smoother site launches and easier content editing.

Thanks to the pilot participants who are giving us valuable feedback as we near the finish line. And I want to personally thank the dedicated members of the Web Services team who have devoted many, many hours to getting this right: Alayna, Danielle, Emma, Fabian, Joni, Kazi, Mark, Nick, Reed, and Vad; and our students Caroline, Mariana, Meaghan, Meghan, and Minh. (Oh, and A and N—the two Web Services babies that were born during the WordPress project!)

We embarked on this massive project because we felt strongly that the experience should be better for everyone at Georgetown who uses our web platform—both content editors and visitors. The new platform is a significant step in that direction, but we'll be working with you over the next year to fine tune things as we all become more comfortable with WordPress.

Some of you have recently received an email about the first batch of migrations following our pilot cohort. We're currently making final adjustments to our migration process and are eager to share what we hope will be helpful guidance as you start moving your sites to the new platform.

And finally, I want to thank the readers of The Cache for your patience over the past year. We're excited to begin the migration phase of the project alongside you!

Check out our WordPress FAQs page for more information on our move to WordPress.

Georgetown.edu redesign: Homework

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

If we had to sum up the last few weeks of the project in one word, it would be “feedback.” Digital Pulp, our vendor, has delivered various versions of key deliverables, including a Messaging Guide, test scripts, and wireframes. Once Digital Pulp delivers one of these documents—that is, when they send it to us over email—the Georgetown project team has a predetermined number of days, so outlined in the project timeline, to review it and voice any concerns or issues. Sometimes the feedback period is only a few days long, and sometimes review periods for certain deliverables overlap. During those times, we feel a kinship to our friends in the classroom, with homework assignments, syllabi, and required reading.

In addition to our own team feedback, we’ve also asked for feedback from our advisory group, which met again in person at the end of September. Advisory group members had the opportunity to work with the site prototype—that is, the wireframes—and tell us what they thought. They also received their first homework assignment: to look over the Messaging Guide and share anything they thought should be adjusted.

In between rounds of feedback, we also finished user testing! A big thank you to our partners in Advancement, who dedicated many hours to revising the script, recruiting testers, and, of course, conducting user testing. The—say it with me—feedback we heard during user testing will help Digital Pulp refine the second round of wireframes, and ultimately result in a site that serves our primary audiences.

Until then, class dismissed!

For more project updates, visit our redesign blog.

Accessibility with Alayna: How does a screen reader work?

Alayna is a project manager on the Web Services team, and one of our web accessibility experts. In this column she’ll share her best tips for making your site more friendly for people who are using assistive technologies.

Screen readers: we talk about them all the time, but how do they actually work? First off, you can watch Alayna do a screen reader demo from TLISI in May (sign in with your NetID and password and start the video at 21:22), or watch this informative video about using a screen reader.

Here’s how a screen reader works in terms of each of the Five Essential Fixes.

1. Descriptive Link Text

Screen reader users will sometimes have the screen reader read the entire list of links that appear on a webpage in order to figure out where they want to go next. This is akin to visual users scanning the navigation bar. Using really good descriptive link text enables screen reader users to understand where links are going, and makes it much easier for them to navigate your website!

2. Use HTML tags for their intended purpose, and don't use deprecated tags.

Since screen readers can only understand the page via the HTML (the programming language the page is written in), you have to make sure your page has good HTML. Tags become deprecated over the years, so take out those old <center></center> and <font></font> tags! If you’re writing your own HTML, make sure you’re current on the latest HTML standards.

3. Use HTML tags to create numbered and bulleted lists.

Again, you’ve gotta have good HTML. This means using the bullet icon in the editor when you’re making a list instead of typing out hyphens or using some other symbol. Using the bullet icon means a screen reader user will hear “list of # items” at the beginning of the list, and “end of list” at the end of the list. Check out the HTML lists page for more help.

4. Add alternative text on all images, and don't use images with text.

When a screen reader user arrives at an image, if the image has alternative text, they’ll hear the alternative text read aloud. This enables screen reader users to have a similar level of interaction with an image as a visual user. Writing good alternative text can be tough, so check out the accessibility website for more help on alt text.

5. Add captions and audio descriptions to videos.

The last one’s an easy one: captions aren’t much help for screen reader users, but audio descriptions are marvelous! Watch this trailer for the movie Frozen to understand audio descriptions. They describe the action in a video, enabling screen reader users or low-vision users to understand what’s happening in the video.

Calories don't count today

Web Services loves food. In The Cache’s birthday edition, we want to share our favorite birthday treats. We asked each member of the web team what they like to eat on their birthdays—with recipes if possible, because who isn’t inspired by The Great British Baking Show.

“Pie > Cake. Especially apple pie with a nice scoop of vanilla ice cream. As with all pies, it’s all in the crust.” —Nick Stabile, Project Manager

“Always pie. Use vodka to make the dough. Trust me (and The New York Times).” —Alayna Ruberg, Project Manager

"When I was a kid, my mom would bake me a two-layer marble birthday cake (Duncan Hines, out of the box). Chocolate frosting. Rainbow sprinkles. Still my favorite thing to eat on my birthday." —Joni Halabi, Web Developer

“Tim Tams! They are basically the Australian version of Oreos, but even better, because they are covered in chocolate.” —Emma Craswell, Director of Web Services

Black tea cake with honey buttercream, because I can have my caffeine and eat it too. The homemade honey frosting takes it to the next level.”—Danielle Held, Project Manager and Editor of The Cache

"I like to eat blueberry pie. Nothing else." —Rob Pongsajapan, Product Manager

“My favorite birthday (and not only) meal is the one which is cooked by my father on holidays: marinated meat in cognac, surrounded by the sweet batter and fried in a pan with oil. It must be a Chinese recipe. It is really tasty and it is big chunk of calories.” —Vadym Myrgorod, Web Developer

“I used to like carrot cake on my birthday, though now I go out and get pho.” –Mark Anderson, (Temp) Developer

“If there is any day that should go perfect, it's your birthday:

—Fabian Alcantara, UX/UI Designer

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or would like to be removed from these updates, please reply to this email. We’ll miss you, but you can still see messages any time by going to groups.google.com.  

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.

 

The Cache: Updates from Web Services (September 2018)

September 2018

A cache is the topmost level of your browser’s memory, where all of your most-used information is stored for fast and easy access. Think: The info you write on a Post-it and stick to your computer versus info you put in a Google Doc and can’t find later. 

This newsletter aims to be your web-editing cache. Only the information you need to know, easy access. No deep-dive (or dictionary) required.

WordPress update: All good things take time

Nick is the project manager coordinating the WordPress migration.

As we push past the craziness of the start of another school year, we’re continuing to work closely with our four pilot sites to get their WordPress sites in tip-top shape. Our developers and designers are working hard to integrate the feedback we're getting from working on these sites to have the platform in excellent condition for launch.

This week we're reaching out to the next group of sites in the legacy Drupal theme that have expressed interest in early migration to let them know how they can begin moving to WordPress next month. Anyone can prepare their website for migration by ensuring content is up to date, learning about web accessibility, implementing essential web accessibility fixes, and thinking about the website from a user’s perspective.

Check out our WordPress FAQs page for more information on our move to WordPress.

Georgetown.edu redesign: Testing, testing

Danielle is a project manager on the Web Services team, and the project manager for the georgetown.edu redesign. In this column she’ll share updates on the project.

Earlier this month, the Georgetown.edu redesign team had its first meeting with our advisory group. The goal of the advisory group is to keep stakeholders updated on project progress and to collect feedback on certain project deliverables. Because it is designed to have representation from all audiences—faculty leadership, research, athletics, staff, undergraduate students, graduate students, and so on—this group serves as an early indicator for how the Georgetown community will react as a whole: a focus group, if you’d like. From here out, we’ll meet with the advisory group about once a month, depending on when we receive certain deliverables from our vendor.

In the last Cache, we mentioned that we’ll test the sitemap and wireframes in the following months. Well, it’s almost that time: testing will begin October 3. The sitemap and wireframes are essentially the blueprints for the site menu and page templates. When we say that we’re “testing” them, we mean that we’ll put these prototypes in front of real, live people and ask them what they think, and to perform simple tasks: Does the layout of this page look engaging? Can you find the study abroad information in the site menu? Where would you expect to find information about GU sports?

Know someone who might be a good candidate? We’re looking for testers now! In particular, we would like to recruit more first-year students who have crystal-clear memories of what it’s like to look for a college and apply to a university for the first time, though all Georgetown-affiliated folks are encouraged to participate. If you’re interested in participating in user testing or would like to refer someone, please see more information and sign up at redesign.georgetown.edu.

Accessibility with Alayna: Assistive technology and you: how web accessibility has huge impact!

Alayna is a project manager on the Web Services team, and one of our web accessibility experts. In this column she’ll share her best tips for making your site more friendly for people who are using assistive technologies.

If you’ve taken our courses and been keeping up with this column, by now you’re an expert on the why and how of web accessibility. You know how to write great descriptive link text and how to add aria-labels to your “Read More” buttons. But what does all this actually mean for people using assistive technology?

First of all, assistive technology isn’t limited to just screen readers. Closed captions, magnifying tools, and Braille readers are just a small sampling of technology used to help navigate the web. And not everyone with a permanent or temporary disability uses an assistive technology! For example, an individual who just had their eyes dilated at the optometrist probably shouldn’t be looking at a screen anyway, but they need websites to have enough color contrast between the text and the background so they can read the text without too much squinting.

The small tweaks we employ to make our content more accessible has huge impact on assistive technology users. Closed captions enable deaf users and bus riders trying to be conscientious of their fellow riders to enjoy a video. Magnifying tools allow me to read this text as I type it without giving myself eye strain, despite the fact that my contacts prescription is about 3 years out of date.

And screen readers: screen readers make navigating the web so much easier for visually impaired users. Stay tuned until next month when we take a deep dive into how making our websites accessible has a huge impact on screen reader users!

How did you get this number?

You’re receiving this email because you are listed as a primary or secondary contact for your website. If you believe you’re receiving this message in error, or would like to be removed from these updates, please reply to this email. We’ll miss you, but you can still see messages any time by going to groups.google.com.  

Still have questions? Comments? Email us at webservices@georgetown.edu.